I feel like prescriptivist grammar is a necessary evil.

On the one hand, it’s a group of arbitrary rules established by a bunch of old dead men who wanted to preserve some shadow of Latin constructs in modern language, and said rules have become stifling and largely unnecessary for thorough and comprehensible communication.

But on the other hand, it’s become something more than a set of rules—it’s become a social norm. Prescriptivist rules are so ingrained into our collective minds that when someone chooses not to follow them, they are, unfortunately, often perceived as less educated, regardless of content or language mastery.

Grammar is a bit like business formal: when you become more established, you have more opportunities to flaunt your own style. But for a job interview, you follow the rules and wear whatever is going to get you hired.

It still is, unfortunately, a discriminatory practice, especially when it comes to non-native speakers. But it seems as though we’re going to be stuck with it for a while still.

WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE - Callie Ann 

WE APOLOGIZE FOR THE INCONVENIENCE - Callie Ann 

katies-green-eyes:

lecinea:

waltdisneyconfessions:

" I don’t think I will be able to see Finding Dory when it hit theaters. Ellen Degeneres use to be one of my role models but when she did her sketch about fashion sizes in America and said that size zero women were ‘nothing’ it hurt so much because I thought she was for everyone, no matter their size. Now every time I think of her I get triggered and depressed instead of the love from her that I use to see. It hurts and it makes me sad because I really wanted to see the movie."

Except that Ellen didn’t say that size zero women were nothing. If I’m not mistaken the direct quote is:

"Really, it’s not just Abercrombie & Fitch, I’ve noticed the trend in women’s clothing. It’s getting ridiculous, there is a size zero. A size zero. Which I don’t understand. Zero is nothing.

It is a critique on how women’s clothing sizes are labeled, not an attack on thin women. I can’t even understand how OP came to that conclusion (unless it’s another quote OP was referring to, in that case I apologize). Zero literally means nothing. And it’s absolutely ridiculous that a clothing size is labeled nothing, or even double nothing, don’t you think so? That is what wrong, and what Ellen was commenting about.Not that it’s wrong to wear a size zero, but that someone was so horrible to label a clothing size as zero.
I hope you read this OP, because it would be a shame if you lost a (in my opinion) excellent role-model over a misunderstanding.

SIGNAL BOOST

katies-green-eyes:

lecinea:

waltdisneyconfessions:

" I don’t think I will be able to see Finding Dory when it hit theaters. Ellen Degeneres use to be one of my role models but when she did her sketch about fashion sizes in America and said that size zero women were ‘nothing’ it hurt so much because I thought she was for everyone, no matter their size. Now every time I think of her I get triggered and depressed instead of the love from her that I use to see. It hurts and it makes me sad because I really wanted to see the movie."

Except that Ellen didn’t say that size zero women were nothing. If I’m not mistaken the direct quote is:

"Really, it’s not just Abercrombie & Fitch, I’ve noticed the trend in women’s clothing. It’s getting ridiculous, there is a size zero. A size zero. Which I don’t understand. Zero is nothing.

It is a critique on how women’s clothing sizes are labeled, not an attack on thin women. I can’t even understand how OP came to that conclusion (unless it’s another quote OP was referring to, in that case I apologize).
Zero literally means nothing. And it’s absolutely ridiculous that a clothing size is labeled nothing, or even double nothing, don’t you think so? That is what wrong, and what Ellen was commenting about.
Not that it’s wrong to wear a size zero, but that someone was so horrible to label a clothing size as zero.

I hope you read this OP, because it would be a shame if you lost a (in my opinion) excellent role-model over a misunderstanding.

SIGNAL BOOST


Anthony Michael Hall and Molly Ringwald playing with a puppy during a break in location shooting of The Breakfast Club.

Anthony Michael Hall and Molly Ringwald playing with a puppy during a break in location shooting of The Breakfast Club.

Tags: people

“Do not read, as children do, to amuse yourself, or like the ambitious, for the purpose of instruction. No, read in order to live.” -Gustave Flaubert [x]

Reblogged from Too Many Words
  • Overheard in Math: "What's a Gatsby?"

Genre Help: Horror

thewritershelpers:

Hey, y’all! How’s that writing coming along?

Today in Genre Help, I’ve compiled a list of links to help further understand and write HORROR (Wiki page definition). (With some appropriate music~ X)

SUB-GENRES

Gothic

Lovecraftian

Noir

Post-Apocalyptic

Erotic

Dark Fantasy

Psychological

Survival

Etc (X/X/X/X/X)

FEARS (in Children)

Common Things Kids Are Afraid Of ~ Things that may not scare adults but are very real to children

Children and Fear ~ Includes stages of life and fears most common in those years (ranges from infants to teenagers)

FEARS (in Adults)

100 Things That Scare Me ~ Not all are life-or-death situations, but a good place to start thinking of ‘the worst case scenario’

Adult Fear (TVTropes) ~ With links and examples

Nighttime Fears and Adulthood ~ Interesting short article of the effects of unresolved childhood fears in adults (namely the dark)

Lingering Fears From Childhood to Adult ~ Another article

SETTING

Abandoned Area (TVTropes)

Top 5 Overused Horror Settings

Horror, Mysteries and Setting: Playing On The Unexpected

Creating An Environment For A Horror Story

Horrific Setting/Scene ~ Almost looks like a writing prompt/English paper assignment, but a good place to look over and get an idea

STORY FORMULA / TIPS

Rule of Scary (TVTropes) ~ With examples at the bottom

Classic Structure of the Horror Novel

13 Tips For Writing Horror Fiction

Generic Horror vs. Innovative Horror

OTHER

The Phobia List

Horror Tropes (TVTropes) ~ Long list of links related to different aspects of horror. Includes setting, characters, expansion on genres, etc.

Nightmare Fuel (TVTropes) ~ Gives examples (and links) of different things people may (or may not) be terrified of, such as mutilation, the paranormal, extreme violence, being hunted, etc.

I personally find this a tricky subject, but I’d recommend tapping into your own personal fears and reflect that into your writing as best you can.

Try also thinking about the way some horror authors write, like Stephen King or Edgar Allan Poe. Read into some if you haven’t.

Comments? Questions? Advice? Feel free to submit!

-J

jessicaschein:

Jane Abbott Lighty, left, and her partner of 35 years, Pete-e Petersen of West Seattle, hold the very first same-sex marriage license, signed for them by King County Executive Dow Constantine, as the King County Recorder’s office starts to issue same-sex marriage licenses at 12:01 A.M.
It’s a good day to be living in Washington state.

jessicaschein:

Jane Abbott Lighty, left, and her partner of 35 years, Pete-e Petersen of West Seattle, hold the very first same-sex marriage license, signed for them by King County Executive Dow Constantine, as the King County Recorder’s office starts to issue same-sex marriage licenses at 12:01 A.M.

It’s a good day to be living in Washington state.

Reblogged from Defenestration

I abhor the practice of making a list of character traits.

I mean really, I couldn’t even give you ten adjectives to describe myself. Why on Earth would anyone think a character can be boiled down to a list of words like “loyal” or “insecure”? In writing, you’re supposed to show, not tell. Rather than just picking some words from a thesaurus, make a list of situations, and try to determine how your character would react to:

  • The death of their parents.
  • Witnessing a murder.
  • Having a child.
  • Falling in love.
  • Getting lost in a country where they don’t speak the language.
  • Running over a small animal in the road.
  • Getting rear-ended in traffic.
  • Losing their most prized possession.
  • Meeting their hero.
  • Learning they’ve contracted a terminal disease.

The answers may surprise you.

Reblogged from Defenestration